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Posts tagged ‘easyb’

25
Dec

Faster Web Tests with Parallel Batches in Thucydides


Web tests are as a rule much slower than other types of tests, but they can be sped up significantly by running them in parallel. However, this is often harder to implement than it sounds. The latest version of Thucydides (version 0.6.0) comes with support for running parallel test batches, making this task much easier.

Web tests make good candidates for concurrent testing, in theory at least, but the implementation can be tricky. For example, although it is easy enough to configure both JUnit and easyb to run tests in parallel, running several webdriver instances of Firefox in parallel on the same display, for example, tends to become unreliable.

The natural solution in this case is to split the web tests into smaller batches, and to run each batch on a different machine and/or on a different virtual display. When each batch has finished, the results can be retrieved and aggregated into the final test reports.

However splitting tests into batches by hand tends to be tedious and unreliable – it is easy to forget to add a new test to a batch, for example, or have unevenly-distributed batches.

The latest version of Thucydides lets you do this automatically, by splitting your test cases evenly into batches of a given size. In practice, you run a build job for each batch. You need to specify two parameters when you run each build: the total number of batches being run (thucydides.batch.count), and the number of the batch being run in this build (thucydides.batch.number).

For example, the following will divide the test cases into 3 batches (“thucydides.batch.count”), and only run the first test in each batch (thucydides.batch.number):

mvn verify -Dthucydides.batch.count=3 -Dthucydides.batch.number=1

This will only work with the JUnit integration. However this feature is also now supported in easyb (as of easyb version 1.5), though using different parameters. When using the Thucydides easyb integration, you also need to provide the equivalent options for easyb:

mvn verify -Deasyb.batch.count=3 -Deasyb.batch.number=1

If you have both easyb and JUnit Thucydides tests, you will need to specify both options.

Parallel web tests on Jenkins

This approach is easy to set up on Jenkins using a multi-configuration build. In the following screenshot, we are running a multi-configuration build to run web tests across three batches. We use a single user-defined parameter (BATCH_NUMBER) to define the batch being run, passing this parameter into the Maven build job properties we discussed above.

The most robust way to aggregate the build results from the different batches is to set up a second build job that runs after the test executions, and retrieves the build results from the batch jobs. You can use the Jenkins Copy Artifacts plugin to do this. First, ensure that the multi-configuration build archives the Thucydides reports, as shown here:

This build will then trigger another, freestyle build job. This job needs to copy the Thucydides report artifacts from the matrix build jobs into the current workspace, and then run the mvn thucydides:aggregate command to generate the Thucydides aggregate reports. The matrix build job reports need to be copied one-by-one for each batch, as the current version of the Copy Artifacts plugin does not support copying from multiple projects in the same action.

Then make sure you publish the generated HTML reports (which will be in the target/site/thucydides directory) for easy access to the test results.

This simple example shows a parallel test running 3 batches – this brought the test execution time from 9 minutes to slightly over 1 minute. Results will vary, of course, but a typical real-world set of web tests would have a larger number of batches.

21
Oct

Thucydides Release 0.4.15 – 2-way JIRA integration


A new version of Thucydides is out – version 0.4.15 – with some exciting new features, updates and improvements. Thucydides is a library designed to make it easier to write automated acceptance criteria on top of WebDriver/Selenium 2 (see this article for a general introduction).

An overview of the highlights of this release are presented here:

  • Two-way integration with JIRA, including support for custom workflows
  • Better support for parallel testing in JUnit and easyb
  • This version uses Selenium 2.9.0
  • Easyb integration uses the latest version of easyb (1.4) from Maven Central (no messy custom repository configuration required)

In the rest of this article, we will concentrate how you can integrate JIRA with your automated acceptance tests using Thucydides.

When you are using Thucydides with JUnit or easyb, tests or scenarios can implement acceptance criteria for particular user stories. A common strategy for organizations using JIRA is to represent story cards, and/or the associated acceptance criteria, as JIRA issues.

To set up JIRA integration with Thucydides, you need to add the thucydides-jira-plugin to your Maven dependencies. The dependencies you will need (including the normal Thucydides ones) are listed here:

    <dependency>
        <groupId>junit</groupId>
        <artifactId>junit</artifactId>
        <version>4.8.2</version>
        <scope>test</scope>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.hamcrest</groupId>
        <artifactId>hamcrest-all</artifactId>
        <version>1.1</version>
        <scope>test</scope>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>net.thucydides</groupId>
        <artifactId>thucydides-junit</artifactId>
        <version>0.4.15</version>
        <scope>test</scope>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>net.thucydides.easyb</groupId>
        <artifactId>thucydides-easyb-plugin</artifactId>
        <version>0.4.15</version>
        <scope>test</scope>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>net.thucydides.plugins.jira</groupId>
        <artifactId>thucydides-jira-plugin</artifactId>
        <version>0.5.4</version>
        <scope>test</scope>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.codehaus.groovy</groupId>
        <artifactId>groovy-all</artifactId>
        <version>1.8.2</version>
    </dependency>         
    ...

Note that the JIRA workflow integration needs Groovy 1.8 or higher to work properly.

You will also need an slf4j implementation, e.g. ‘slf4j-log4j12’ (if you are using Log4j) or ‘logback-classic’ (if you are using LogBack) (see here for more details). If you’re stuck, just add slf4j-simple:

    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.slf4j</groupId>
        <artifactId>slf4j-simple</artifactId>
        <version>1.6.1</version>
    </dependency>

In Thucydides, you can refer to a JIRA issue by placing a reference to the corresponding JIRA issue number either in the name of the test (using the @Title annotation, for example), or, more simply, by using the @Issue or @Issues annotation as shown here:

    @RunWith(ThucydidesRunner.class)
    public class SearchByKeywordStoryTest {

        @Managed(uniqueSession = true)
        public WebDriver webdriver;

        @ManagedPages(defaultUrl = "http://www.wikipedia.com")
        public Pages pages;

        @Steps
        public EndUserSteps endUser;

        @Issue("#WIKI-1")
        @Test
        public void searching_by_unambiguious_keyword_should_display_the_corresponding_article() {
            endUser.is_on_the_wikipedia_home_page();
            endUser.looks_up_cats();
            endUser.should_see_article_with_title("Cat - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia");

        }
    }

In this example, the test will be associated with issue WIKI-1.

Alternatively, you may want to associate an issue (such as a story card) with all of the stories in a test case by placing the @Issue (or @Issues) annotation at the class level:

 
        @RunWith(ThucydidesRunner.class)
        @Issue("#WIKI-1")
        public class SearchByKeywordStoryTest {

            @Managed(uniqueSession = true)
            public WebDriver webdriver;
            
            @ManagedPages(defaultUrl = "http://www.wikipedia.com")
            public Pages pages;

            @Steps
            public EndUserSteps endUser;

            @Test
            public void searching_by_unambiguious_keyword_should_display_the_corresponding_article() {
                endUser.is_on_the_wikipedia_home_page();
                endUser.looks_up_cats();
                endUser.should_see_article_with_title("Cat - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia");

            }
        }

Thucydides can use these annotations to integrate with the issues in JIRA. The most simple JIRA integration involves adding links to the corresponding JIRA issues in the Thucydides reports. To activate this, you simply need to provide the *jira.url* command line option. You do however need to pass this option to JUnit using the maven-surefire-plugin, as shown here:

 
  <build>
    <plugins>
        <plugin>
            <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
            <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId>
            <version>2.10</version>
            <configuration>
                <argLine>-Xmx1024m</argLine>
                <systemPropertyVariables>                              
                    <jira.url>http://jira.acme.com</jira.url>                               
                </systemPropertyVariables>     
            </configuration>
        </plugin>
        ...

For tighter, round-trip integration you can also use thucydides-jira-plugin. This will not only include links to JIRA
in the Thucydides reports, but it will also update the corresponding JIRA issues with links to the corresponding
Story page in the Thucydides reports. To set this up, add the thucydides-jira-plugin dependency to your project
dependencies:

    <dependency>
        <groupId>net.thucydides.plugins.jira</groupId>
        <artifactId>thucydides-jira-plugin</artifactId>
        <version>0.5.4</version>
        <scope>test</scope>
    </dependency>    

You also need to provide a username and password to connect to JIRA, and the URL where your Thucydides reports will be published (for example, on your CI server). You do using by passing in the jira.username, jira.password and thucydides.public.url system parameters.

 
  <build>
    <plugins>
        <plugin>
            <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
            <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId>
            <version>2.10</version>
            <configuration>
                <argLine>-Xmx1024m</argLine>
                <systemPropertyVariables>                              
                    <jira.url>http://jira.acme.com</jira.url>                               
                    <jira.username>${jira.demo.user}</jira.username>
                    <jira.password>${jira.demo.password}</jira.password>
                    <thucydides.public.url>http://localhost:9000</thucydides.public.url>
                </systemPropertyVariables>     
            </configuration>
        </plugin>
        ...

Thucydides also generates aggregate reports grouping results for stories and features. To include the JIRA links in these reports as well, you need to set the jiraUrl configuration option in the
maven-thucydides-plugin, as illustrated here:

        
    <plugin>
        <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
        <artifactId>maven-site-plugin</artifactId>
        <version>3.0-beta-3</version>
        <configuration>
            <reportPlugins>
                <plugin>
                    <groupId>net.thucydides.maven.plugins</groupId>
                    <artifactId>maven-thucydides-plugin</artifactId>
                    <version>@project.version@</version>
                    <configuration>
                         <jiraUrl>http://jira.acme.com</jiraUrl>              
                     </configuration>
                 </plugin>
            </reportPlugins>
        </configuration>
    </plugin>         

If you do not want Thucydides to update the JIRA issues for a particular run (e.g. for testing or debugging purposes), you can also set thucydides.skip.jira.updates to true, e.g.

    $mvn verify -Dthucydides.skip.jira.updates=true

You can also configure the plugin to update the status of JIRA issues. This is deactivated by default: to use this
option, you need to set the thucydides.jira.workflow.active option to ‘true’, e.g.

 
    $mvn verify -Dthucydides.jira.workflow.active=true

The default configuration will work with the default JIRA workflow: open or in progress issues associated with successful tests will be resolved, and closed or resolved issues associated with failing tests will be reopened. If you are using a customized workflow, or want to modify the way the transitions work, you can write your own workflow configuration. Workflow configuration uses a simple Groovy DSL. The following is an example of the configuration file used for the default workflow:

 
    when 'Open', {
        'success' should: 'Resolve Issue'
    }

    when 'Reopened', {
        'success' should: 'Resolve Issue'
    }

    when 'Resolved', {
        'failure' should: 'Reopen Issue'
    }

    when 'In Progress', {
        'success' should: ['Stop Progress','Resolve Issue']
    }

    when 'Closed', {
        'failure' should: 'Reopen Issue'
    }

You can write your own configuration file and place it on the classpath of your test project (e.g. in the src/test/resources directory). Then you can override the default configuration by using the thucydides.jira.workflow property in the Maven pom.xml file or directly on the command line e.g.

 
    $mvn verify -Dthucydides.jira.workflow=my-workflow.groovy

Alternatively, you can simply create a file called <jira-workflow.groovy and place it somewhere on your classpath. Thucydides will then use this workflow. In both these cases, you don’t need to explicitly set the thucydides.jira.workflow.active property.

You can also integrate JIRA issues into your easyb Thucydides stories. When using the Thucydides easyb integration, you associate one or more issues with the easyb story as a whole, but not with the individual scenarios. You do this using the thucydides.tests_issue notation:

 
    using "thucydides"

    thucydides.uses_default_base_url "http://www.wikipedia.com"
    thucydides.uses_steps_from EndUserSteps
    thucydides.tests_story SearchByKeyword

    thucydides.tests_issue "#WIKI-2"

    scenario "Searching for cats", {
        given "the user is on the home page", {
            end_user.is_on_the_wikipedia_home_page()
        }
        when "the end user searches for 'cats'", {
            end_user.looks_up_cats()
        }
        then "they should see the corresponding article", {
           end_user.should_see_article_with_title("Cat - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia")
        }
    }   

You can also associate several issues using thucydides.tests_issues:

                                 
    thucydides.tests_issue "#WIKI-2", "#WIKI-3"

To use easyb with Thucydides, you need to add the latest version of thucydides-easyb-plugin to your dependencies if it is not already there:

     
    <dependency>
        <groupId>net.thucydides.easyb</groupId>
        <artifactId>thucydides-easyb-plugin</artifactId>
        <version>0.4.15</version>
        <scope>test</scope>
    </dependency> 

As with JUnit, you will need to pass in the proper parameters to easyb for this to work. You will also need to be using the maven-easyb-plugin version 1.3 or higher, configured to pass in the JIRA parameters as shown here:

 
        <plugin>
        <groupId>org.easyb</groupId>
        <artifactId>maven-easyb-plugin</artifactId>
        <version>1.3</version>
        <executions>
            <execution>
                <goals>
                    <goal>test</goal>
                </goals>
            </execution>
        </executions>
        <configuration>
            <storyType>html</storyType>
            <storyReport>target/easyb/easyb.html</storyReport>
            <easybTestDirectory>src/test/stories</easybTestDirectory>
            <parallel>true</parallel>
            <jvmArguments>
                <jira.url>http://jira.acme.com</jira.url>                               
                <jira.username>${jira.demo.user}</jira.username>
                <jira.password>${jira.demo.password}</jira.password>
                <thucydides.public.url>http://localhost:9000</thucydides.public.url>
            </systemPropertyVariables>     
            </jvmArguments>
        </configuration>
    </plugin> 

Once this is done, Thucydides will update the relevant JIRA issues automatically whenever the tests are executed.

23
Sep

Introducing Thucydides


What is Thucydides

Thucydides is a tool that lets you use WebDriver-based unit or BDD tests to write more flexible and more reusable WebDriver-based tests, and also to generate documentation about your acceptance tests, including a narrative description of test, along with the corresponding screen shots, and also high-level summaries and aggregations of the test results. Read more »